Tables and figures

Figures

1.1.1

Reasons for writing

15

1.1.2

A social model of academic writing

16

2.3.1a

An original abstract in structured form

32

2.3.1b

The same abstract in unstructured form

33

2.3.2a

An original abstract for a review paper

34

2.3.2b

The same abstract in structured form

35

2.6.1

A schematic illustration of the prose version of the

Method used by Slatcher and Pennebaker

46

2.12.1

The authors' response to an editorial request

69

3.1.1

Extracts from Routledge's book proposal form

77

3.5.1

Plotting the same data with different vertical axes

106

3.5.2

Pie charts are difficult to label and read

106

3.5.3

Two-dimensional displays are easier to read than three-

dimensional displays

107

3.5.4

An interaction between the results obtained from two

conditions and two groups

108

3.6.1

A typical format for a scientific poster

112

3.7.1

Examples of how academics write book reviews

120

3.7.2

A checklist for book reviewers

121

3.8.1

An example of a letter to an editor

124

4.4.1

A typical evaluation sheet for editors and referees

153

4.8.1

Career landmarks in different disciplines

178

Tables

1.1.1

Some characteristics of academic writing

4

1.1.2

Flesch scores and their interpretation

7

1.1.3

Some rhetorical devices used in academic articles

9

1.1.4

Multiple and overlapping thought processes when writing

11

1.1.5

Quotations from academic writers

13

2.1.1

The average percentage occurrence of title formats for

research and review papers

26

2.1.2 Titles used by students for their projects 27 2.3.1 Examples of studies with structured abstracts published in the health and social sciences 34

2.4.1 The approximate percentage of research journals supplying key words 37

2.4.2 Different methods for supplying key words 38

2.4.3 Ten ways to produce effective key words and phrases 39 2.9.1 The proportions of acknowledgements devoted to different aspects 54

2.10.1 Writers' aims and preferred referencing styles 61

3.1.1 Authors from hell versus dream writers 79

3.3.1 A 'scoreboard' giving the number of studies that show homework has an effect at different ages 88

3.3.2 An extract from a more detailed (unpublished) 'scoreboard' 88

3.3.3 A 'scoreboard' with critical features 89

3.3.4 Effect sizes for studies of the effectiveness of homework 90 3.4.1 Information provided in a sample of 50 conference papers 98

3.5.1 The percentage of articles containing tables and graphs 101

3.5.2 An original table that contravenes rule 2 by giving data too accurately 103

3.5.3 The data in Table 3.5.2, rounded up 103

3.5.4 The average productivity scores of different kinds of writers 103

3.5.5 The data in Table 3.5.4, reorganised to make it easier to read 103

3.5.6 The effects of inappropriate internal spacing in a table 104

3.5.7 Two contrasting descriptions of the contents of a table 105 3.7.1 The hidden meanings of phrases in book reviews 116

4.2.1 Circulation numbers and impact factors for psychology journals in 2005 138

4.2.2 Some typical criticisms of impact factors 138

4.2.3 Ten types of open-access journal in 2005 140 4.3.1 Some common problems that authors should attend to before submitting a manuscript 148

4.4.1 The main concerns of referees 155 4.5.1 Mean scores for men and women authors on measures of readability for different text genres 163

4.6.1 Things that writers do to avoid writing . . . 166

4.6.2 Quotations on procrastination from academic writers 166

4.7.1 Different kinds of collaboration when writing in pairs 171

4.7.2 The advantages and disadvantages of writing in pairs 171

4.7.3 Typical activities of writing partners 172 4.8.1 A portrait of Nobel laureates 179

0 0

Post a comment