The Sixty Four Element Question

Each of the character dimensions contains sixteen Elements, as we have already seen with Motivations. Each character dimension is referred to as a Set of Elements. All four Sets come together to create what is called a Chess Set (due to its eight by eight grid) as illustrated below:

Purpose Set Evaluation Set

Knowledge

Ability

Desire

Thought

Actuality

Aw aie

Self Aware

Perception

Proven

Theoty

Hunch

Unpio^n

Effect

Trtjst

Test

Cause

Order

Equity

Inequity

Chaos

Inertia

Projection

Speculation

Change

Accurate

Ej^ject-ation

Accurate

Result

Ending

Unending

Process

Consider

Logic

Feeing

Reconsider

Pursuit

Control

Uncontrolled

Avoid

Certainty

Probability

Possibility

Potentiality

Proaction|

Inaction

Protection

Reaction

Faith

Conscience

Temptation

Disbelief

Support

Het>

Hind et

Oppose

Deduction

Reduction

Production

Induction

Acceptance

Evaluation

Réévaluation

Non-acceptance

Motivation Set Methodology Set

A good way to get a feel for the content of and relationships between character dimensions is through the Archetypal Characters. Beginning with the Motivation Set, when we superimpose the Archetypal Characters onto the character Elements, an "archetypal pattern" appears as follows:

Consider

Antagonist

Uncontrolled

Steplic

Mapping the Archetypal Pattern

The archetypal pattern formed in the Motivation Set clearly illustrates the consistency and balance of the character Elements. In each quad of four Elements, the items that are diagonal from one another hold the greatest potential for conflict because they are exact opposites.

For example, Pursuit is the opposite of Avoid. As a result, when we place the Protagonist on the Motivation of Pursuit, we would expect the Antagonist to represent Avoid. As we have illustrated in the previous section, that is exactly the case. Similarly, when we place the Reason Archetype on Logic, it comes as no surprise to find Emotion residing on Feeling, since it is diagonal from Logic. In fact, every pair of Archetypes that are in a diagonal relationship will generate the greatest dynamics between them. This is why we call two Elements in diagonal opposition a Dynamic Pair.

Fuiiuil Ceifilml

Protagonist Rea,™

UsiconliicJled Avoid

Emotion Am agonist

Archetypal Methodologies

Antagonist

Fuiiuil Ceifilml

Protagonist Rea,™

UsiconliicJled Avoid

Emotion Am agonist

Shifting our attention to the Methodology Set, a very useful thing becomes evident. Because the Methodology Elements are also arranged in Dynamic Pairs, we can simply duplicate the Archetypal pattern from the Motivation Set and the Archetypal Characters will cover the Methods they represent in stories as well.

Motivation Set Methodology Set

Consider

Sidekick

Sidekick

Help Guindan

T«mpl4tis?ti

Skepiie

Guard ian

Rroduïlloift

Skeptic

For example, a Protagonist who is Motivated by Pursuit employs a Methodology of Pro-action, and a Skeptic who is Motivated to Oppose employs a Methodology of Non-Acceptance.

This Archetypal Pattern continues through all four character dimensions such that a Protagonist will be motivated by Pursuit, employ a Methodology of Proaction, Evaluate its progress by the Effect it has, and strive toward achieving Actuality as its Purpose. Each of the Archetypal Characters follows the same pattern for both its External and Internal characteristics, resulting in an alignment of character Elements in four dimensions.

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