UNIT Describing Places Buildings

1 m You will hear a man talking to a travel agent about a city he finally decides to visit. Read the table then listen to the tape and tick the information mentioned. Finally, use the table to talk about the city described.

name:

location:

reason for visiting: sights:

Athens Dublin [] Edinburgh [] Greece 0 Ireland 0 Scotland [D holiday Q business Q

castle Q Royal Palace Q St Patrick's Cathedral Q

free-time activities: pubs Q museums Q theatres [[] cinemas Q cafés Q parks Q funfairs Q bistros Q

recommendation: highly recommended Q expensive Q boring Q

A composition describing a place/building should consist of:

a) an introduction giving brief information about the name and location of the place /building and stating the reason for choosing to write about it (e.g. What It is famous for, what makes It so special, etc.)

b) a main body giving both general and specific details about the place/building usually moving from the general features to specific ones, i) when you describe a place you should give the overall impression by referring to landscape, buildings, landmarks, etc, and particular details (sights to see, places to go, things to do) ii) when you describe a building you should write about its surroundings (e.g. situated In Oxford Street...), then give a detailed description of its exterior and interior; and, c) a conclusion in which you express your feelings or opinion concerning the subject or give a recommendation.

• You may also be asked to explain why a particular place is important to you, popular, etc. Note that the number and length of paragraphs varies depending on the topic.

• Descriptions of places/buildings may be included in several other types of writing tasks, such as stories, assessment reports, articles, brochures, letters and magazine articles.

Points to Consider

• Descriptions of places/buildings may include: factual information such as age, size, colour, materials, etc (e.g. The temple, with 10-metre tall marble columns, was built In 800 BC.), details relating to the senses (sight, hearing, smell, touch, taste) to suggest mood and atmosphere (e.g. Visitors' footsteps on the worn stone floors echo through the cool, dark corridors, disturbing the tranquil silence.), opinions/impressions of the place or building (e.g. Tourists are fascinated by its air of mystery.)

• Each aspect of the description should be presented in a separate paragraph beginning with a clear topic sentence.

• The use of descriptive vocabulary (e.g. exquisite, exclusive, towering, etc), a variety of linking words and structures as well as narrative techniques will make your writing more interesting.

• Present tenses are normally used when describing a place for a tourist brochure or a magazine article. Past tenses are normally used when describing a visit to a place/building. First and second conditionals (will/would) can be used when you describe your ideal city/house, etc. Note that when we give factual information about a place or building this is normally given using Present tenses, (e.g. I flew to Madrid last Monday. Madrid Is situated in the central point of the Iberian peninsula with a population of about 3,000,000.)

introduction

Paragraph 1

name I location I population of the place, reason for choosing the place

Moin Body

Paragraphs 2 - 3

general features and particular details (place: surroundings, sights, facilities, free-time activities building: surroundings, detailed description of exterior/interior) Paragraphs 4-5 explanation and example/justification

Final Paragraph comments/feelings and/ or a recommendation

2 Read the model below and fill in the plan on the right. Then, look at the highlighted adjective-noun combinations, close your books and try to remember as many of them as possible.

Describe o large, busy city

Built around a small peninsula in the south east of China, Hong Kong, now one of the most densely populated places on earth, is a city of extreme contrasts, where East meets West, and the latest technology is equally as important as ancient customs are.

The streets of Hong Kong are a frenzy of activity and deafening noise. The roads are congested with vehicles, from sparkling limousines to dusty rickshaws, while countless hordes of people stream past on the pavements, and in the crowded narrow alleyways, the senses of the pedestrian are bombarded with a bewildering variety of exotic sights and smells. In contrast, not far from the chaotic, cramped city centre lie parks with cool streams, shrines and chirping birds. Meanwhile, tranquil mountains form a breathtaking backdrop to the towering skyscrapers of steel and concrete packed closely around the harbour, where huge modern ships float alongside little Chinese junks..

Below the bright neon lights, garishly advertising every brand name conceivable, visitors will find an endless variety of shops and restaurants competing for space on Hong Kong's manic streets. You can buy anything here, ranging from state-of-the-art computer technology to hand-made silk suits. There are also fish and bird markets all over the city, where heaps of gleaming silver fish can be found displayed next to brilliantly-coloured squawking parrots. Tourists and locals alike flock to the Jade Market, hidden on a side street, with its intricately-carved pieces depicting Chinese icons, Buddhas and dragons made of smooth green stone. For food, Hong Kong Is second to none, as it offers a wide choice of dishes in all sorts of eating establishments. The city's nightlife, like its shops and restaurants, caters for all tastes, whether you are searching for the opportunity to serenade your loved one in a karaoke bar or are simply after a beer and a bit of dancing.

Perhaps the strangest thing about Hong Kong is the way ail ofits" dramatically contrasting features co-exist so harmoniously. However, unless you witness it for yourself, you will never know what a pleasant atmosphere this creates. So. for an unforg unique experiett^try Hong Koi* 3tfou»won't regret it.

• Introduction location, population, reason

• Main Body general features particular details

Conclusion

//f Location Verbs and / Prepositions

• There are a number of verbs used to describe the location and/or surroundings of a place. These may explain position (e.g. the old house is situated next to/is surrounded by..)] they may also give some suggestion of movement (e.g. the road leads up to/winds past...) and/or action (e.g. the statue towers above/stands at the top of...).

0 These verbs are naturally used with prepositions and prepositional/adverbial phrases (e.g. leads up to -winds past - stands at the top of, etc).

2 Read the model below and fill in the plan on the right. Then, look at the highlighted adjective-noun combinations, close your books and try to remember as many of them as possible.

Describe o large, busy city

Built around a small peninsula in the south east of China, Hong Kong, now one of the most densely populated places on earth, is a city of extreme contrasts. where East meets West, and the latest technology is equally as important as ancient customs are.

The streets of Hong Kong are a frenzy of activity and deafening noise. The roads are congested with vehicles, from sparkling limousines to dusty rickshaws. while countless hordes of people stream past on the pavements, and in the crowded narrow alleyways, the senses of the pedestrian are bombarded with a bewildering variety of exotic sights and smells. In contrast, not far from the chaotic, cramped city centre lie parks with cool streams, shrines and chirping birds. Meanwhile, tranquil mountains form a breathtaking backdrop to the towering skyscrapers of steel and concrete packed closely around the harbour, where huge modem ships float alongside little Chinese junks..

Below the bright neon lights, garishly advertising every brand name conceivable. visitors will find an endless variety of shops and restaurants competing for space on Hong Kong's manic streets. You can buy anything here, ranging from state-of-the-art computer technology to hand-made silk suits. There are also fish and bird markets all over the city, where heaps of gleaming silver fish can be found displayed next to brilliantly-coloured squawking parrots. Tourists and locals alike flock to the Jade Market, hidden on a side street, with its intricately-carved pieces depicting Chinese icons, Buddhas and dragons made of smooth green stone. For food. Hong Kong is second to none, as it offers a wide choice of dishes in all sorts of eating establishments. The city's nightlife, like its shops and restaurants, caters for all tastes, whether you are searching for the opportunity to serenade your loved one in a karaoke bar or are simply after a beer and a bit of dancing.

Perhaps the strangest thing about Hong Kong is the way all of its dramatically contrasting features co-exist so harmoniously. However, unless you witness it for yourself, you will never know what a pleasant atmosphere this creates. So, for an unfc unique experience, try Hong Kong - .you. won't regret it.

• Introduction location, population, reason

• Main Body general features particular details

Conclusion

Location Verbs and /' Prepositions

• There are a number of verbs used to describe the location and/or surroundings of a place. These may explain position (e.g. the old house te they may also give some suggestion of movement (e.g. the road leads up to/winds past...) and/or action (e.g. the statue tower? above/stands at the top of...).

These verbs are naturally used with prepositions and prepositional/adverbial phrases (e.g. leads up to -winds past - stands at the top of, etc).

14) - - <hc «1« ngh, hand side is a rurthcr 15) the street, 1« R ^¡c.

The street disappears 17)

rises 18) - the whole scene.

3 Fill in the gaps with words from the list below Use the words only once. stretch out, is set in, winds through, nestles at, is perched on, curi es around, sprawl out, is located in, slopes down to -

1 The small house, which the centre of town, is packed with antiques.

2 The narrow country lane the wooded valley.

3 The steep hillside the seashore.

4 The hotel the towering Welsh mountains.

5 The river the base of the mountain.

6 The plains in every direction.

7 The cabin precariously aclifftop.

8 The suburbs into the countryside.

9 A tiny village the foot of the high mountain.

4 Read the following description. Fill in each of the gaps with a suitable preposition or adverb and circle each of the 'location' verbs.

*» «—' 5) - S,ree,.he bottom of .he steps is a shop,

11» ■ thefirst floor hangs imposing building. A small balcony 13) -------------

14) - - <hc «1« ngh, hand side is a rurthcr 15) the street, 1« R ^¡c.

The street disappears 17)

rises 18) - the whole scene.

Project Management Made Easy

Project Management Made Easy

What you need to know about… Project Management Made Easy! Project management consists of more than just a large building project and can encompass small projects as well. No matter what the size of your project, you need to have some sort of project management. How you manage your project has everything to do with its outcome.

Get My Free Ebook


Responses

  • giovanna
    What is the general features,particular details,conclusion from describe a large city?
    2 years ago
  • andrew
    What is the unit in describing book?
    2 years ago

Post a comment