The Conversion

I. Iamb: Rising Meter, for Conversation

"Hello?"

"I want to talk."

"Will wonders ever cease?

"I won't apologize, you know."

"I don't have anything to say to you."

II. Trochee: Falling Meter, for Emphasis

"Later."

"Don't hang up yet."

"If you don't then I will leave you."

"-pologize until I'm good and ready."

III. Anapest: Tripping Meter, for Excitement "Eat a rock."

"Do you think we can talk?"

"Don't you dare condescend anymore!"

"Do you think we can talk without fighting awhile?"

"Not unless you apologize, buddy. Take back what you said."

IV. Dactyl: Awkward Meter, for Grotesqueness "Sorry then."

"What are you sorry for?"

"Calling you. Hating you. Loving you."

"Never accuse me again of dishonesty."

"How could you blame me when my lines were lifted verbatim?"

V. Spondee: Hard Meter, for Stress "STU-PID!" "PO-ET-AST-ER!" "A-POL-O-GIZE RIGHT NOW!"

"I CAN'T BE-LIEVE YOU STOLE MY LINES!" "I CAN'T BE-LIEVE I MAR-RIED YOU, YOU CREEP!"

VI. Pyrrhic: Soft Meter, to Soothe a "

sorry, "why do we fight?" "oh we fight when we write." "why don't you hang up and come home?" "i plan to soon as i write this poem."

Now let's see how these precepts hold up when applied to actual poems.

Below are excerpts from two poems —the first by Emily Bronte and the second by Anne Bronte. I'll scan each work and then make some observations about meter and meaning:

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