Indexes and abstracts

Indexes and abstracts supplement the library catalog as described by Bopp and Smith 1995 Users may come into a library, consult the main catalog, and falsely assume they have searched the entire contents of the library. The catalog may confirm the holdings of a periodical magazine or journal but not its contents a poetry collection but not individual poems the title of an author's collected works but not the individual work newspapers but not individual news stories. Indexes and abstracts are...

New Encyclopaedia Britannica

Chicago Encyclopaedia Britannica, 1993. Considered by many to be the premier English-language general encyclopedia. The writing is scholarly and therefore sometimes difficult to understand in a subject area with which you're unfamiliar. Articles in the Micropaedia are short and fact-filled, while the Macropaedia has long articles surveying broad aspects of a topic. Very extensive list of bibliographic references at the end of each article so you can find additional...

Know how to use your source materials and cite them

See the section Citing sources on the Links page p. 52 . There's also a nice section on using sources in the middle of another article entitled Writing a General Research Paper from the Roane State Community College OWL Henley, 1996 . The section, What Happens When the Sources Seem to be Writing My Paper For Me describes how to break up long quotations and how to cite an author multiple times without letting the author take over your paper, and it links to both the MLA and the APA style...

Find out how to search for journals and newspapers at your library

Most libraries have either print, CD-ROM, or online either in the library or sometimes on the Web indexes of magazine, journal and newspaper articles referred to as periodicals available for users. Some of these are abstracts of the articles, which are short summaries written to describe the article's contents in enough detail so that a reader can decide whether or not to seek out the full text. Some of these sources may be in the form of full text, where the entire articles have been entered...

How does information get onto the Web anyway

Until 1994 or 1995, most of the information on the internet which then migrated to the Web was posted by scientists, educators, students and the government. Since then, commercial use of the Web has exploded and so has the posting of hobby pages or personal home pages, many of which are posted by the same people who also use the Web for their work at universities or business enterprises. Scholarly or informative material which might be useful to a researcher gets posted on the Web in a number...