Compose the illustration to help the reader

After a photograph has passed the tests of quality and message, it should be tailored to give the reader as much help as possible. Crop the picture to a shape suitable for the journal's column dimensions without reduction in size while retaining the highest possible resolution. Select the center of the field to coincide with the center of interest. Affix letters and arrows identifying features of interest. Keep any lettering horizontal and consistent in size, font, and contrast for easy reading. In the legend, include a key to any symbols used. In the corner of the photograph, if appropriate, include a bar to represent a length suitable to the scale. Finally, consider grouping related figures into a single plate to fill an entire printed page, rather than scattering them throughout the publication.

ELECTRON MICROSCOPE LABORATORY

TRANSMISSION EM SCANNING EM

IMAGE PROCESSING

TECHNICAL PERSONNEL SAMPLE SECTIONING

SAMPLE STAINING

Fig. 3.8. A typical drawing tree gazinta describes a relatively stable situation.

Fig. 3.8. A typical drawing tree gazinta describes a relatively stable situation.

Explanatory artwork

Explanatory figures are those produced to communicate organization, illustrate basic principles, or otherwise clarify text materials. This figure type includes both drawings and diagrams - all of those flowcharts, diagrams, maps, algorithms, and line art that some people characterize as "illustrations" as opposed to tables and photographs.

The effectiveness of explanatory artwork depends upon how well it focuses audience attention. This type of artwork must show the specific details of key features while omitting others to minimize the distraction caused by extraneous details. A common mistake in scientific writing is to present a figure that is much more complex than the accompanying prose. When this is done, illustrations confuse rather than inform readers.

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