Narrative Writing Applications Standard

The main goal of narrative writing is to narrate a sequence of events and scenes with sensory details and appropriate strategies to develop plot and character. The writer presents an action or a series of actions in such a way that the reader has a sense of being present at that time and place. Narrative writing describes what happened but also may describe how it happened and why it happened. It requires writers to closely observe, explore and reflect upon a wide range of experiences. It encourages creativity, and offers writers an opportunity to understand the emotions and actions of themselves and others. The significance of the writing is often revealed through the writer's attitude employing strategies such as dialogue, voice, specification, and comparison and contrast of characters. There are two types of narrative writing: Fictional Narratives and Biographical/Autobiographical Narratives.

Fictional narratives are stories that recreate an experience, real or imagined. A [email protected] story unravels in a purposeful fashion, resolving a conflict, tracing the path of important change, solving a mystery, or building to a discovery. Each event in the story has meaning or significance relative to this turning point; thus, it is easy, upon rereading to trace the pattern of meaning through the story's internal structure.

Biographical or autobiographical narratives shape, recreate, reveal, or clarify an actual experience. A connection between the author's experience and the reader is critical. Biographical and autobiographical narratives contain the same features and elements of a fictional narrative with the exception that the story elements are not imagined; rather they are real. The significance of the writing is often revealed through the writer's attitude employing strategies such as dialogue, voice, specification, and comparison and contrast of characters.

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