Chapter Exercise

The main aim of this exercise is to make you think about the following crucial philosophical idea: how you study a topic (for example, the methods used, your definitions and founding assumptions about the nature of that topic, the way that the topic is 'isolated' from other possible topics, or other possible ways of studying the topic) will always influence the results you get. We tend to think that knowledge becomes objective when we put aside our personal biases, assumptions, and beliefs, and seek the truth in a 'disinterested' manner. However, the main external influence on our reasoning is not our emotions or subjective prejudices, but the inbuilt 'bias' of the methods and theories we use. Of course, that said, many disciplines (especially in the sciences) work from a different philosophical assumption: that the methods used are 'neutral', that they have no influence on the outcome of the research and analysis, and hence that knowledge is not intersubjective. Find out for yourself just what sort of philosophy of knowledge your 'discipline' or profession works within.

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