Click here is never necessary

Most web users today assume that something that looks like a link is a link. Years ago, Click here may have been a useful instruction; it's not needed any more. Don't announce links with Click here; just put what people will get by "clicking here" into your link format.

The Click here links give no information to separate one link from another.

The first three red headlines are not links; the last two are - but nothing on the page helps people know that.

Centered text is harder to read. (See Chapter 7.)

Figure 12-11 Most people see the headings in red first, but they must find the small blue Click here . the first two Click here . . . links carry no meaning.

The Click here links give no information to separate one link from another.

The first three red headlines are not links; the last two are - but nothing on the page helps people know that.

Centered text is harder to read. (See Chapter 7.)

Figure 12-11 Most people see the headings in red first, but they must find the small blue Click here . the first two Click here . . . links carry no meaning.

links to move ahead. And

www.toastmasters.org

^mrn'mmmmKmmmmmmmmmmmmmm

Toastmasters is improving its educational program-—^

... —With the titles in underlined s.siiT" srv «..¿T^ I w/J blue, it's much easier to recognize the links.

The new leadership manual helps your club Make the most of the opportunities that the new manual. Competent Leadership. gives your club.

Pay October dues online now Access the Club Business section of the site.

See pictures from the 2005 international convention

See who won the 2005 World Championship of Public Speaking

Figure 12-12 A suggested revision.

The key messages are now the links, not Click here.

Blind web users scan with their ears, just as sighted web users scan with their eyes. Screen-reading software helps them do this by allowing them to pull all the links on a web page into a separate list, as you can see in Figure 12-13. Can you imagine the frustration of listening when all you hear is Click here, Click here, Click here or More, More, More, More?

For more about how blind people work with web sites, see Theofanos and Redish, 2003.

Figure 12-13 Web users who listen to the screen can ask their screen-reading software to pull all the links on a page into a list and then read only that list.
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