Divide web content by questions people ask

People come to web sites with questions, so using questions and answers may help people find what they need.

As you write questions, match the way that people would ask the question. You want to help them quickly recognize the question as the place to get the information they need. In fact, an advantage of using questions is that if users come with only a vague sense of what they want, they may recognize a question even if they had not thought of those specific words.

Caroline Jarrett suggests that too often FAQs (frequently asked questions) on web sites are really EAQs (easily answered questions). Be sure that the questions you include are the ones that your site visitors come with - not just the ones you want to answer.

Writing good questions comes up again in more detail in Chapter 10 on headings.

Figure 5-10, from Briggs and Stratton, a company that sells engines and other machinery, shows how one company organizes its customer support by topic, product, and questions.

If your question is here, you are just one click from the answer.

Links take you to more questions - and to a place to submit your new question.

Figure 5-10 Databases of questions organized by users' topics are a useful part of many web sites.

www.briggsandstratton.com

You start by searching I ^J or going through a visual table of contents to the five sections.

If your question is here, you are just one click from the answer.

Links take you to more questions - and to a place to submit your new question.

Figure 5-10 Databases of questions organized by users' topics are a useful part of many web sites.

www.briggsandstratton.com

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