Dont put thick lines between the columns or between the rows in a table

Making each cell of a table into a box with equal weight borders all around it doesn't help your web users. People don't use tables cell by cell; they use tables to see relationships along a row. Thick lines between columns stop people from moving along the row - just the opposite of what you want people to do.

Also, heavy lines draw people's eyes. You want your site visitors to focus on the essential information in the table, not on the lines between the information.

Here are two ways to make it easy to find each row and to read across the row:

• Make the lines between columns lighter than the lines between rows.

• Eliminate lines altogether and use shading on alternate rows.

The table from the English-language visa page of the German Foreign Office (Figure 9-29) uses alternate-row shading well.

ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWVZ

©The shading on every other row makes the table easy to use.

ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWVZ

Country

Entry visa required no/yes

Afghanistan

yes

Albania

yes

Algeria

yes

Andorra

no

Angola

yes

Antigua and Barbuda

yes

Argentina

no

Armenia

yes

Austria*

no

Australia (including the Cocos Islands, Norfolk Island, Christmas Island)**

no

Azerbaijan

yes

Bahamas

yes

Bahrain

yes

Bangladesh

yes

Barbados

yes

Belarus (see also White Russia)

yes

Figure 9-29 Use techniques such as alternate-row shading or very light lines to help people focus on the information in tables and to help them read across the row they need.

www.auswaertiges-amt.de/www/en/willkommen/einreisebestimmungen/liste_html

Figure 9-29 Use techniques such as alternate-row shading or very light lines to help people focus on the information in tables and to help them read across the row they need.

www.auswaertiges-amt.de/www/en/willkommen/einreisebestimmungen/liste_html

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