More isnt enough

More, More, More, More is useless to a web user who is listening. (You can add words to the alt text that screen-readers use, even if you have only More showing on the screen.)

But More by itself also isn't helpful to sighted users who are quickly scanning the page. You can make links meaningful by

• adding words to specify what visitors will get "more" of

• using informative words as the link

Figure 12-14 shows how Access Washington, a portal site, explains what you will get more of in each of its sections. Figure 12-15 shows how the Exploratorium, a hands-on museum in San Francisco, highlights meaningful words in its brief descriptions, rather than relying on More.

The More links don't just 1 say More. They tell you what you will get more information about.

Figure 12-14 A very clear site that expands all its More links.

The More links don't just 1 say More. They tell you what you will get more information about.

More emergency info would \ * * J be better if info were spelled _ out as information.

Figure 12-14 A very clear site that expands all its More links.

www.access.wa.gov

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Figure 12-15 Another way to avoid More is to make meaningful words in the description into links.

Instead of saying More at the I end of each brief description, the Exploratorium uses key words in each description as the link to more information on that topic.

Figure 12-15 Another way to avoid More is to make meaningful words in the description into links.

www.exploratorium.org

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